First Nations In Northern B.C. Worry Site C Dam Will Obliterate Their Heritage

RED POWER MEDIA

Drummers from Doig River First Nation drum on the Bear Flats near Fort St. John. Native people and archaeologists are concerned BC Hydro’s Site C dam project will flood the Peace River Valley, which holds centuries-old graves and trading artifacts. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail) Drummers from Doig River First Nation drum on the Bear Flats near Fort St. John. Native people and archaeologists are concerned BC Hydro’s Site C dam project will flood the Peace River Valley, which holds centuries-old graves and trading artifacts. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

The Globe and Mail

For 12,000 years, people have roamed Peace River Valley, leaving
traces of their presence. But as Mark Hume reports, BC Hydro’s
proposed Site C dam threatens to obliterate that heritage.

Gerry Attachie stood beside the small, unmarked grave that was overgrown with Saskatoon berry shrubs and looked out over the Peace River Valley.

He knew that if BC Hydro’s $9-billion Site C dam is built one day, the water level would rise to cover Bear Flats below, long a sacred gathering place for the Dane-zaa people. It would climb up to the top of the knoll where he was gathered with…

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